Tuesday, 28 May 2019

Hogarth's Gin Lane and Beer Street

Although I had known about the horrors of drinking gin which William Hogarth presented in his 1751 print Gin Lane, I was not aware that it was paired with Beer Street which shows that beer is a much better alternative.

The two prints can be seen in the Internet Archive's scanned version of the 1875 volume, The Works of HogarthGin Lane and Beer Street, but - as I have acquired copies of the prints - I have reproduced the text which accompanies them:

GIN LANE


The great artist conjured up to his imagination, in the picture now before us, a horrible and loathsome neighbourhood, the presiding genius of which is gin. No signs of health—no evidences of gladness are there: disease—wretchedness—and misery everywhere meet the view. All the houses, save one, are falling into ruins; and that one is the dwelling of the pawnbroker, who drives a thriving trade in that dreadful district. For gin is the deity worshipped there: to procure gin no means are left untried; the shocking predilection has fastened itself upon all the inhabitants; and every article of domestic comfort—every household necessary—even to the smallest and meanest portions of raiment, are carried to the pawnbroker, to obtain a few pence for the purchase of gin. Were gin the elixir of life, instead of the bane and the poison, men, women, and children could not display a greater eagerness to obtain a dram. The influence of the fire-water is everywhere apparent,—in the ruined dwellings—the thousand proofs of dire penury and abject wretchedness—and the sickly looks, emaciated frames, trembling limbs, pestiferous breath, carious teeth, livid lips, sunken eyes, and diseased bodies of the people. The countenance of the pawnbroker exhibits the grinding disposition which prompts him to examine well the articles brought by the depraved creatures to his establishment, lest he should lend too much upon them! The very children in that neighbourhood are habituated from their infancy to imbibe the fatal venom.
We behold in one place a boy fast asleep—completely stupefied with the alcoholic liquor, while over him creeps a snail—the emblem of the pawnbroker; and close by is another wretched, neglected, lost child, ravenous with hunger, and gnawing a bare bone, which a cur, equally the victim of famine in a district where gin is bought in preference to food, is endeavouring to snatch from him. Farther on a woman is seen pouring a dram down her infant’s throat—thus almost from the moment of its birth, impregnating its frail constitution with the seeds of disease! Even the very charity-children greedily swallow the burning fluid when they can obtain it—for the taste is acquired from their earliest infancy! One of the lost girls is supplying her mother with the alcoholic poison—thinking, poor ignorant creature! that she is performing a filial duty; while the woman is already in such a filthy state of intoxication, that it is found necessary to wheel her home in a barrow. There, where a house has fallen to ruins, the corpse of a hanging suicide is disclosed: here, seated on the steps of a gin vault, is an emaciated wretch, who has just expired through atrophy; and on the same stairs is a drunken beast in female shape, whose legs have broken out in loathsome ulcers, and who is taking snuff, regardless of her child slipping from her arms into the area of the gin vault. And it is gin—accursed gin, that has driven the man to suicide—that has caused the dead wretch to waste away into consumption and go off like the snuff of a candle—and that has degraded a being in the glorious form of woman to a level with the veriest beasts crawling on the earth’s surface. It is gin, too, that has killed the female whom we behold two men placing in a shell by order of the parish beadle; while the orphan child of the deceased is about to be carried off by that official to the workhouse. Maddening—maddening, too, as well as death-dealing, is gin; and we see a cripple fighting, and a rabid man dancing with a pair of bellows on his head and a spit in his hand. But—oh! frightful spectacle! The wretch, driven furiously insane by gin, has spitted a living child whom its mother has left alone while she visits the gin vault! The entire scene in hideous—horrible to contemplate! Let us suppose that some good genius could arise, and, pointing to that picture, thus address the drunkard:—
“Lost and degraded wretch, wherefore rush thus madly on the road to ruin? Has the vision before you no power to make you pause suddenly, and turn away aghast from the loathsome spectacle? Or will you pursue your career of dissipation, and become a conspicuous character in gin lane? If so, learn somewhat of the histories of those, alive or dead, whom you behold in your dream! And first of the man whom you see through the opening in the ruined wall, hanging to a beam. He was a barber, and an honest, industrious, worthy man. He married a young woman, gifted with great beauty; and his entire hope, his joy, his love, were centred in her. His toils were forgotten in the cheering influence of domestic comfort; and two children blessed the union, at first so auspicious! But his wife became a drunkard; and by that fall, all her poor—her loving—her unfortunate husband’s hopes were blasted: his house became a desert—his children were parentless. In vain did they look to their father—his heart was broken—his mind was in ruins. He had one consolation—an old mother, on whom the protection of his children seemed to rest. Even that was soon over. She could not survive the shame which had crept into her son’s household: she never raised her head—she became hearsed in his misfortunes; and he followed her funeral. Then he himself took to drinking gin, to drown his cares; and the climax of human misery was seen in that once happy home. Wife, parent, future prospects, happiness—all gone for ever! The mother to the tomb—the wife to the gin-shop—the children to the workhouse—and the husband to the halter and the beam!
“Next behold that loathsome woman seated upon the steps, and hear of her! fifteen years ago, when she herself was fifteen—for old and wretched as she seems, she is but thirty now—she was one of the fairest of God’s creatures, and the pride of honoured and doating parents. On a fatal evening she accompanied a young man to a tea-garden; and there she partook of the accursed draught. Gin gave her up as a victim to the seducer—and her parents died of broken hearts. A little while—and behold, every evening— sometimes twice, sometimes thrice—that young female entered the gin vault beneath those steps, to seek in stimulants the artificial gaiety and excitement which were denied by nature and by conscience to her crushed and ruined heart. Alas! poor girl—she was then only seventeen; but the woes of fifty winters were upon her mind! The cold blast of poverty— the searching mists of shame—the storm of an agitated existence—the torrent of reckless passions—the whirlwind of ever-varying emotions—and the eddies of heart-rending feelings, had in two short years all vented their rage upon the intellect, the soul, and the life of that hopeless girl! Oh! wherefore did so young a creature parade the streets in a land of charity and of chivalry, where the female form has held as a patent direct from the Divinity, bearing in its chaste and charmed helplessness the assurance of its strength and the amulet of its protection ? ’Twas gin that rendered the young creature thus abased—thus degraded: ’tis gin that has stripped her of her loveliness—hurried her on through all the varied phases of vice and infamy—until, prematurely old at the age of thirty, you behold her in all the squalor of rags and the loathsomeness of ugliness, seated in drunken apathy on those steps!
“And now contemplate that wasted form, from which crazy tenement the soul has just passed away: mark well that ghastly corpse seated at the bottom of the steps—the steps leading to the palace of Death! Ten times every day, down those steps had lately crawled that living skeleton—clothed in rags—emaciated—blear-eyed—toothless—haggard in countenance, trembling in limbs, shaking in his head, and stammering in his voice. He was but forty years old this day—and looked sixty; and he might still be walking erect, in the prime of life—happy—lively—robust—and hale, had not his whole life been devoted to gin. And yet this besotted wretch persisted to the last in declaring that drink never injured him—that it even did him good—and that he required it. Not injured him!—it consumed his property—it reduced him to rags—it heaped loathsome diseases of all kinds upon him—it made his bones visible through his skin—it pulled out his teeth—it dimmed the fire of his eyes—and it dug his grave at the age of forty!
“Those—those, wretched being, are the effects of gin! It is strong drink that destroys domestic peace, ruins female virtue, conducts the tradesman to ruin, opens the gates of the mad-house, throws chains around the criminal, inspires the wicked with courage to perpetrate crime, establishes workhouses, gilds the sign of the pawnbroker’s shop, and places a bar across the portals of the house of God. From the lips of the gin-glass have myriads drunk damnation: gin is the cause of blows, of strife, of domestic misery, of disease, of death! The anguish of neglected wives—the piteous cries of children famishing through want been of food—the last prayer of the malefactor upon the gibbet—the anathema of the felon whose chains clank in the prison-yard—the woes of an existence lingered out in the workhouse—the howls of lunatics—the dying murmurs of the suicide—the remorseful whisperings of the lost girl’s conscience—the wounds, the tears, the oaths, the shrieks, the screams, the wails,—all, all the tokens of human misery which now exist before you, and which have converted yon once thriving neighbourhood into a charnel-house of horrors—all, everything there depicted, may be traced to gin!”



BEER STREET


The following description of this plate is somewhat abridged from the commentator Trussler’s account:—“We observe in the admirable plate before us, a complete cessation from all labour, and all parties enjoying themselves with a refreshing draught of the cheering liquor, beer. On the left side of the picture, we perceive a group of jolly taproom politicians, a butcher, a drayman, and a cooper. The drayman is evidently whispering soft things into the not-unwilling ear of a servant-maid, who seems to be all attention to what he is saying; a fact which is plainly apparent from the appearance of her eyes and hands, and the general disposition of her figure. From the house-door key in her hands she seems to have come out of some neighbouring house for a tankard of beer which the family is waiting for, and while her figure admirably fills in the foreground of the picture, her loitering by the way gives the artist an opportunity of showing up the idleness of the common order of servants, who neglect their duty and waste their employer’s time in profitless gossiping. The butcher is splitting his sides with laughter to see the girl so easily imposed on, and the cooper behind with a pipe in his mouth, a full pot in one hand, and a shoulder of mutton in the other, plainly shows that where good eating and drinking abound, there true happiness and jollity will be found also. On the right of the picture, is a city-porter who has just set down his load and is recruiting his strength with a draught of the refreshing beverage. The artist has humorously made the porter’s load to consist of trashy books on their way to the trunkmaker’s to be sold for waste paper. In the middle of the plate are seen two fish-women loaded with British herrings. Behind are some paviours at work; further back is a lady of quality in a sedan-chair going to Court; the flag is displayed on the steeple in the distance, denoting a royal birth-day; so corpulent is she, that her chairmen are not able to carry her, without the refreshing stimulus of a pot of porter on the way. Our author has not forgotten to ridicule the enormous size of the hoop in use in those days, which, when pulled up on each side closely resembled the wheels of a carriage. We next notice on the steps of a ladder a painter, ragged but happy, painting the sign of the Barley Mow, and at the top of a house a tailor’s work-shop, whose men within seem to partake of the general joy; the bricklayers on the roof of the next house, are no whit behindhand in expressing the most lively satisfaction at the arrival of the expected beer. This house is an ale house, the landlord of which is supposed to be repairing it, in opposition to his neighbour, Nicholas Pinch, the pawnbroker, who finds it hard to live for want of trade; the man’s house appears decayed, ready to fall in over his head, symptoms well marked by the sign, props, and rat-trap in the chamber; he is seen taking in a half-pint of beer through a hole in his door, not daring to open it, showing that such professions thrive only on the miseries of others, but starve when the public prospers. The general design of this print is to expose the pernicious custom of gin-drinking, whose awful effects are vividly depicted in the plate of Gin Lane, and to show mankind that, if they must have recourse to strong liquors, beer is by far the best and most wholesome stimulus to indulge in.”
Early in the year , the following advertisement was issued:—“On Friday next will be published, price one shilling each, Two large Prints, designed and etched by Mr. Hogarth, called Beer-street and Gin-lane. A number will be printed in a better manner for the curious at s. d. each. And on Thursday following will be published Four Prints on the subject of Cruelty. Price and size the same. n.b. As the subjects of these Prints are calculated to reform some reigning vices peculiar to the lower class of people, in hopes to render them of more extensive use, the author has published them in the cheapest manner possible. To be had at the Golden Head in Leicester-Fields, where may be had all his other Works.”
The following verses under these two Prints were written by the Reverend James Townley:

BEER STREET

Beer, happy product of our Isle
        Can sinewy strength impart,
And, wearied with fatigue and toil,
        Can cheer each manly heart.

Labour and Art, upheld by thee,
        Successfully advance;
We quaff thy balmy juice with glee,
        And Water leave to France.

Genius of Health, thy grateful taste
        Rivals the cup of Jove,
And warms each English generous breast
        With Liberty and Love.


GIN LANE

Gin, cursed fiend! with fury fraught,.
        Makes human race a prey;
It enters by a deadly draught,
        And steals our life away.

Virtue and Truth, driv’n to despair,
        Its rage compels to fly;
But cherishes, with hellish care,
        Theft, Murder, Perjury.

Damn’d cup! that on the vitals preys,
        That liquid lire contains,
Which madness to the heart conveys,
        And rolls it through the veins.

“It is probable,” says a writer of the period, “that Hogarth received the first idea for these two Prints from a pair of others by Peter Breugel which, exhibit a contrast of a similar kind. The one is entitled La grasse Cuisine (‘ the fat Kitchen’): the other La maigre Cuisine (‘the meagre Kitchen’). In the first, all the personages are well-fed and plump; in the second, they are starved and slender. The latter of them also exhibits the figures of an emaciated mother and child, sitting on a straw mat on the ground, whom I never saw without thinking on the female, &c., in Gin Lane. In Hogarth, the fat English blacksmith is insulting the gaunt Frenchman; and in Breugel, the plump cook is kicking the lean one out of doors.”
Of their intentions, Hogarth gives the following account:—“When these two Prints were designed and engraved, the dreadful consequence of gin-drinking appeared in every street. In Gin-lane, every circumstance of its horrid effects is brought to view in terrorum. Idleness, poverty, misery, and distress, which drive even to madness and death, are the only objects that are to be seen: and not a house in tolerable condition but the Pawnbroker’s and Gin-shop. Beer-street, its companion, was given as a contrast; where that invigorating liquor is recommended, in order to drive the other out of vogue. Here all is joyous, and thriving industry and jollity go hand in hand. In this happy place the Pawnbroker’s is the only house going to ruin; and even the small quantity of porter that he can procure is taken in at the wicket, for fear of farther distress.”


The opinion which Hogarth entertained of the writings of Dr. Hill, may be discovered in his Beer Street, where Hill’s critique upon the Royal Society is put into a basket directed to the Trunkmaker, in St. Paul’s Churchyard.


Friday, 25 May 2018

American Express + Starwood Preferred Guest = 34,000 Avios

Earlier this year, I noticed a post at Head for Points which flagged up the potential to earn 25,000 for signing up for two American Express credit cards and meeting a relatively low minimum spend target in 90 days.

Having just completed the process (there was a delay in starting as I was working towards a minimum Gold spend), I discovered that there were actually 34,000 Avios available. The following steps give the process for maximising this collection opportunity.

The process demands a couple with the same address to be working on this together. For the sake of argument, I have called them Rapunzel and Flynn to help get through this tangled process.

  1. Both Rapunzel and Flynn need to sign up for free Starwood Preferred Guest membership at www.starwoodhotels.com. Both accounts need to have the same home address. Make a note of the membership numbers as they are needed later.
  2. Rapunzel needs to sign up for an American Express Starwood Preferred Guest Credit Card. Following this referral link earns an extra 1,000 SPG points when the minimum spend is hit. If she just signs up via the American Express website directly, she will miss out on this 1,000 points. As part of the application process, she will need to enter her SPG membership number. There is a £75 annual fee for this card which is refunded pro rata when it is cancelled.
  3. When Rapunzel's card arrives, she needs to spend £1,000 within the first 90 days. For this she earns the 1,000 points on the spend, and a bonus 10,000 for spending £1,000 within 90 days. (I use a combination of billhop and SumUp to ensure that the spend is as close to £1,000 as possible so as not to waste any odd points.)
  4. While she is spending her £1,000, Rapunzel needs to generate a referral code for Flynn via her online account.
  5. Flynn should then apply for his SPG card via the link he has received. Rapunzel will earn 5,000 points for having referred him.
  6. When Flynn's card arrives, he needs to spend £1,000 within the first 90 days. For this he earns the 1,000 points on the spend, and a bonus 10,000 for spending £1,000 within 90 days. Having been referred by Rapunzel, he also earns an additional bonus 1,000 points on the spend.
  7. When Rapunzel's 17,000 points have transferred to her SPG account and she has paid off her bill (which will have included the annual fee), she needs to cancel her Amex SPG card.
  8. When Flynn's 12,000 points have been transferred to his SPG account and he has paid off her bill (which will have included the annual fee), he needs to cancel his Amex SPG card.
  9. Flynn will then need to visit 'Pass the Starpoints, please' link when signed into his SPG account and transfer his 12,000 SPG points to Rapunzel's account.
  10. Finally, Rapunzel will need to transfer the combined 29,000 SPG points to her BA account via 'Transfer AirMiles' link when signed into her SPG account. As she is transferring over 20,000 points, she is awarded a bonus 5,000 Avios.
When you cancel an American Express card, you will receive a final statement which will have a credit balance for the pro rata refund of the annual fee. When this arrives, you will need to contact American Express and they will either arrange this to be returned to a bank account or credited to the balance of any other American Express card you may hold.

Having cancelled the Amex SPG cards, there is a minimum wait of six months from the date of cancellation before you will be entitled to earn any sign up bonuses on the cards again.

The original HfP post includes various other ways in which to use the amassed SPG points, but for Avios collectors, these are the 10 steps.

Tuesday, 15 August 2017

English Resources from ZigZag

A couple of years ago, I discovered that ZigZag Education offers the opportunity for people to review their resources before publication through their author portal. Reviewers earn a voucher for their reviews which can be redeemed against ZigZag's resources. Over the past couple of years, I have reviewed several resources and was able to buy some £200-worth of resources for my department last term.

As well as helping to ensure that a largish educational publisher is selling quality resources, I think this is a useful CPD opportunity for teachers, and I have encouraged my staff to sign up to review material.

Below are two reviews (the questions are predefined) which I have written for ZigZag: I purchased the A-Level Language one for the department, and I confess I found some useful ideas in the GCSE Literature one which I duly borrowed, but careful budgeting meant I could not justify buying it to supplement the work staff had already put into our own lesson planning and resources.

The link in the review title will take you to the resource's page on ZigZag. I do not earn any commission from any sales, but I did receive a voucher and a box of chocolates for republishing my reviews here!


Note on the formatting: This review was based on a draft of the resource that had not yet been formatted. Before publication, it was professionally formatted by one of our designers. 

1. On the whole what did you think about this resource?
This is a really good resource which provides a really useful teaching and revision tool. The content is varied and meets the requirements of the specification and provides scope for students to develop their thinking and research beyond the specification if they want.

2. What you particularly like/dislike about this resource?
The inclusion of annotated texts and suggested answers is always really helpful - both for teachers and students! - and the section on comparisons looks as if it would work really well to allow students to develop their responses.

3. How this resource enhances learning?
The resource provides unseen texts which can be used for both teaching and revision and supplements exisiting material well. The focus on spoken texts is nice as text books often contain just a single example. The inclusion of a glossary and the theories meets the demands of the specification well.

4. Comments on presentation and layout?
The transcripts could be presented in the centre of the page to maximise space around them for annotation. It would be nice not to have the panel on the right of every page (especially for the notes pages) as it's only relevant for the annotated transcripts.

5. Specification and level reviewer teaches (e.g. AQA A AS/A2)
AQA A-Level Language

6. How does the resource match and interpret this specification?
This meets the demands of both the AS and A-Level AQA specification well. The questions match the AO requirements and the advice and information is what AQA demand.

7. Suggestions for improving this resource?
Beyond the tidying up that will take place before publication, I don't think there is anything particular which would stop this being used today. It might be nice to include a couple of full responses to the question (not just the 'short' questions) to allow students to compare essays against their own work to allow them to self/peer assess and become more critical of their own work.

8. Would you purchase this resource?
Yes.

...and having used it, I can confirm the material I used did work well with a Year 12 group, and the remaining material will be revisted in Year 13 as revision.


Note on the formatting: this review was based on a draft of the resource that had not yet been formatted. Before publication, it was be professionally formatted by one of our designers. 

1. On the whole what did you think about this resource?
Overall, I was very impressed with the content of this pack: there is a great deal of useful and useable material.

2. What you particularly like/dislike about this resource?
I particularly liked the depth of detail about each of the poems, the suggested answers, the inclusion of suggested pairings and the sample answers. There is nothing to dislike.

3. How this resource enhances learning?
The resource is initially useful to teachers who may be unfamiliar with some of the poems in the anthology. To students it would be allow self-directed study, but at GCSE is possibly more likely to be used as a revision tool or the fill in blanks from missed lessons.

4. Comments on presentation and layout?
It is very text heavy: even breaking up the opening analyses with the inclusion of poets' images would be welcome.

5. Specification and level reviewer teaches (e.g. AQA A AS/A2)
AQA English Language and English Literature at both GCSE and A-Level.

6. How does the resource match and interpret this specification?
The resource matches the new specification really well and is closely focused on the material that AQA has released so far. This is a great feature in its favour.

7. Suggestions for improving this resource?
Would it be possible to include copies of the poems in the pack? This would make it a little more useful as a whole to save having to have the anthology too. Another very small suggestion would be to include the questions on the suggested answers page for each poem to save refering back. Could blank(er) copies of the linking mindmaps be included to use as worksheets so students could work on creating the pairings - and reasons for pairings - themselves?

8. Would you purchase this resource?
Yes

9. Other comments?
Thank you for a really useful resource which will certainly support the first teaching of a new specification.

Thursday, 1 June 2017

Homemade Nakd Bars Recipe

My daughter recently demonstrated a penchant for Nakd bars to replace her toddler snacks. With their natural ingredients, we were happy with this, but the price made this a prohibitively expensive snack. However, I also thought that this meant they should be easy to make at home. I therefore consulted the ingredients lists, did a couple of calculations to turn percentages in weights and googled a little to see what other people's experiences with homemade nakdness was. This - very simple - recipe is the result.

Ingredients

  • 180g Medjool dates (these will need to be pitted, but are juicier than 'standard' dates)
  • 180g cashew nuts
  • 65g raisins
  • 25g 70% chocolate
  • teaspoonful of vanilla extract
Method
  1. Put all of the ingredients into a food processor and turn it on. The mixture will look quite dry and seem to thump a lot as it is processed, but leave the machine running and eventually it should come together in a solid ball. (This did take a few minutes, and my ancient food processor did start getting quite warm as the final mixture is quite stiff.)
  2. Line a 1lb loaf tin with cling film. (There is time to do this while the food processor is processing.)
  3. Put the mixture into the lined loaf tin and press down to form a flattened rectangle. (I found another loaf tin pressed down on the mixture was quite helpful with this.)
  4. Fold the cling film over the top of the mixture and put in the fridge overnight to chill.
  5. Unwrap the slab of fruity goodness and slice it into 12 (or fewer if you like larger portions) bars. I wrapped each bar in a square of greaseproof paper and twisted the ends. These then seem to keep quite happily in the fridge for a couple of weeks at least. (They were all eaten by this time, so they may last longer if you exercise greater self-control.)
I am confident that any of the other flavours can be made very simply by adapting the ingredients based on the percentages printed on the official products' wrappers. My choice of 180g for the dates was simply based on the packet size sold in the supermarket.

Friday, 17 February 2017

Young Adult Fiction: Technology Reading List

Having updated the blogged reading list for my doctoral research on a somewhat irregular basis over the years and compiled them a couple of years ago, they are somewhat bitty.

This is therefore an updated bibliographical list which will form an appendix for my thesis in the (hopefully not too distant) future. I have removed the blurb which was present in previous lists, as each title links to Amazon where much more information can be found.

Anderson, MT (2002) Feed
London: Walker Books.

Anderson, MT (2004) The Game of Sunken Places
New York: Scholastic.

Ashby, Madeline (2012) vN
Nottingham: Angry Robot.

Ashby, Madeline (2013) iD
Nottingham: Angry Robot.

Asher, Jay & Mackler, Carolyn (2011) The Future of Us
London: Simon & Schuster.

Bacigalupi, Paolo (2009) The Windup Girl
London: Orbit.

Bannon, James (2011) i2
Los Angeles: Banco Picante Press.

Barnes, Jennifer Lynn (2013) The Naturals
London: Quercus.

Blackman, Malorie (1999) Dangerous Reality
London: Doubleday.

Bradbury, Jason (2009) Dot.Robot
London: Puffin.

Briggs, Andy (2008) hero.com: Rise of the Heroes
Oxford: Oxford University Press.

Briggs, Andy (2008) villain.net: Council of Evil
Oxford: Oxford University Press.

Brooks, Kevin (2010) iBoy
London: Penguin.

Cabot, Meg (2008) Airhead
London: Random House.

Card, Orson Scott (1977/1985/1991) Ender's Game
New York: Tom Doherty Associates.

Clarke, Cassandra Rose (2013) The Mad Scientist's Daughter
Nottingham: Angry Robot.

Cline, Ernest (2011) Ready Player One
London: Arrow Books.

Cline, Ernest (2015) Armada
London: Random House.

Collins, BR (2011) Gamerunner
London: Bloomsbury.

Collins, BR (2012) MazeCheat
London: Bloomsbury.

Collins, Suzanne (2008) The Hunger Games
London: Scholastic.

Collins, Suzanne (2009) Catching Fire (Hunger Games Book 2)
London: Scholastic.

Collins, Suzanne (2010) Mockingjay (Hunger Games Book 3)
London: Scholastic.

Condie, Ally (2010) Matched
London: RazorBill.

Dalquist, Gordon (2013) The Different Girl
New York: Dutton Books.

Dashner, James (2011) The Maze Runner
Frome: Chicken House.

Dashner, James (2013) The Eye of the Minds
New York: Delacorte Press.

Dashner, James (2014) The Rule of Thoughts (Mortality Doctrine 2)
London: Random House.

Dashner, James (2015) The Game of Lives (Mortality Doctrine 3)
London: Random House.

Day, Susie (2010 (2008)) serafina67 *urgently requires life*
New York: Scholastic.

Dickinson, Peter (2001 (1998)) Eva
London: Macmillan.

Doctorow, Cory (2008) Little Brother
London: Harper Voyager.

Doctorow, Cory (2012) Pirate Cinema
New York: Tom Doherty Associates.

Driza, Debra (2013) MILA 2.0
London: HarperCollins.

Driza, Debra (2013) MiLA 2.0 Origin: The Fire
London: HarperCollins.

Driza, Debra (2014) MiLA 2.0: Renegade
London: HarperCollins.

Falkner, Brian (2011) brainjack
London: Walker Books.

Fisher, Catherine (2007) Incarceron
London: Hodder Children's Books.

Goldman, EM (1995) The Night Room
London: Puffin.

Harrison, Kate (2011) Soul Beach
London: Indigo.

Harrison, Kate (2012) Soul Fire
London: Indigo.

Hodkin, Michelle (2012) The Unbecoming of Mara Dyer
London: Simon & Schuster.

Horton, Ben (2010) Monster Republic
London: Corgi Books.

Hoyle, Fred (2010 (1957)) The Black Cloud
London: Penguin.

Lancaster, Mike (2011) 0.4
London: Egmont.

Lancaster, Mike (2012) 1.4
London: Egmont.

Landstrom, Sam (2010) Metagame
Las Vegas: Amazon Encore.

Lassiter, Rhiannon (1998) Hex
London: Macmillan.

Lassiter, Rhiannon (1999) Hex: Shadows
London: Macmillan.

Lassiter, Rhiannon (2000) Hex: Ghosts
London: Macmillan Children's Books.

Leigh, Jena (2012) Revival
Amazon.

Lewis, Stewart (2011) You have seven messages
New York: Delacorte Press.

Lloyd, Saci (2011) Momentum
London: Hodder Children's Books.

London, Alex (2013) Proxy
New York: Philomel Books.

Lord, Karen (2013) The Best of All Possible Worlds
London: Jo Fletcher Books.

McEvoy, Seth (1986) All Geared Up (Not Quite Human Book 2)
London: Dragon Grafton Books.

McLaughlin, Lauren (2011) Scored
New York: Random House.

Merle, Claire (2012) Glimpse
London: Faber & Faber.

Meyer, Marissa (2012) Cinder
London: Puffin.

Meyer, Marissa (2013) Scarlet
London: Penguin.

Miller, Lauren (2014) Free to fall
New York: HarperCollins.

Murail, Marie-Aude, Murail, Lorris & Murail, Elvire (2002) Golem 1: Magic Berber
London: Walker Books.

Murphy, Pat (2012 (1987)) Rachel in Love
Untreed Reads.

Myers, EC (2012) Fair Coin
New York: Pyr.

Myracle, Lauren (2004) ttyl
New York: Amulet Books.

Naam, Ramez (2013) Crux
Nottingham: Angry Robot.

Naam, Ramez (2013) Nexus
Nottingham: Angry Robot.

Ness, Patrick (2013) More Than This
London: Walker Books.

Nix, Garth (2012) A Confusion of Princes
London: HarperCollins.

Odle, EV (1923) The Clockwork Man
London: Doubleday, Page & Co..

Oliver, Lauren (2011) Delirium
London: Hodder and Stoughton.

Patrick, Cat (2013) The Originals
New York: Little Brown and Company.

Pearson, Mary (2011) The Rotten Beast
Macmillan USA.

Pearson, Mary E (2010) The Adoration of Jenna Fox
London: Walker Books.

Philbrick, Rodman (2006) The Last Book in the Universe
London: Usborne Publishing Ltd.

Plaisted, Caroline (2001) e-love
London: Piccadilly Press.

Plum-Ucci, Carol (2008) Streams of Babel
Orlando: Houghton Mifflin.

Price, Lissa (2012) Starters
London: Doubleday.

Revis, Beth (2014) The Body Electric
Scripturient Books.

Rose, Malcolm (2010) Jordan Stryker: Bionic Agent
London: Usborne Publishing Ltd.

Roth, Veronica (2011) Divergent
London: HarperCollins.

Roth, Veronica (2012) Insurgent
London: HarperCollins.

Rush, Jennifer (2013) Altered
New York: Hachette.

Seifert, Christine (2011) The Predicteds
Naperville: Sourcebook Fire.

Shusterman, Neal (2008) Unwind
London: Simon & Schuster.

Shusterman, Neal (2012) Unwholly
London: Simon & Schuster.

Stephenson, Neal (1992) Snow Crash
London: Penguin.

Terry, Teri (2012) Slated
London: Orchard Books.

Terry, Teri (2013) Fractured
London: Orchard Books.

Terry, Teri (2015) Mind Games
London: Orchard Books.

Thorpe, David (2007) Hybrids
London: HarperCollins.

Tintera, Amy (2013) Reboot
New York: Harper Teens.

Tsui, Susan (2012) You Shouldn't Call Me Mommy
Oneiros Press.

Vizzini, Ned (2004) Be More Chill
New York: Miramax Books.

Wasserman, Robin (2007) Hacking Harvard
New York: Simon Pulse.

Wasserman, Robin (2009) Crashed
London: Simon & Schuster.

Wasserman, Robin (2009) Skinned
London: Simon & Schuster.

Wasserman, Robin (2010) Wired
London: Simon & Schuster.

Wells, Robinson (2012) Feedback
London: Harper Teen.

Wells, Robison (2011) Variant
New York: HarperCollins.

Wells, Robison (2013) Blackout
New York: HarperCollins.

Westerfield, Scott (2004) So yesterday
New York: RazorBill.

Westerfield, Scott (2005) Uglies
London: Simon & Schuster.

Young, Suzanne (2013) The Program
New York: Simon Pulse.

Zadoff, Allen (2013) Boy Nobody
London: Orchard Books.